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Thousands of Zoom videos exposed online due to identical naming convention

By Cookie Monster - on 4 Apr 2020, 9:44am

Thousands of Zoom videos exposed online due to identical naming convention

Zoom has once again come under fire for another security and privacy practice. 

According to The Washington Post, thousands of Zoom videos can be viewed online through a simple online search because Zoom names every video recording in an identical way. One search for these recordings apparently revealed more than 15,000 results.

Many videos are said to include personally identifiable information and intimate conversations which are recorded in people's homes. The Washington Post shared that these videos include one-on-one therapy sessions, small-business meetings that discussed private company financial statements, and elementary school classes in which children's faces, voices and personal information were exposed.

The publication added that these videos appeared to have been recorded through Zoom's software and transferred onto separate online storage space without a password. Videos that remain on Zoom's own system are not affected. In response to this report, Zoom released the following statement: 

“Zoom meetings are only recorded at the host’s choice either locally on the host’s machine or in the Zoom cloud. Should hosts later choose to upload their meeting recordings anywhere else, we urge them to use extreme caution and be transparent with meeting participants, giving careful consideration to whether the meeting contains sensitive information and to participants’ reasonable expectations.”

Zoom CEO Eric S. Yuan acknowledged on a blog post that the company fell short of users' privacy and security expectations. Therefore, Zoom is committed to dedicating the necessary resources over the next 90 days to better identify, address and fix these issues proactively.

Source: The Washington Post