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NVIDIA shrinks its pro-grade Quadro RTX GPUs to fit into laptops

By Koh Wanzi - on 28 May 2019, 1:34am

NVIDIA shrinks its pro-grade Quadro RTX GPUs to fit into laptops

Image Source: NVIDIA

Sandwiching Quadro RTX into workhorse laptops

NVIDIA is bringing its Quadro RTX 5000 graphics card to laptops. This is a powerful pro-level GPU, so it could open the door to laptops that are much more appealing to creative professionals who deal with demanding rendering or video work in the engineering and creative field.

The previous mobile Quadro flagship was the Pascal-based P5200, and the Quadro RTX 5000 boasts a small performance bump to 9.4 TFLOPS, up from 8.9 TFLOPS. However, the RTX GPU can take advantage of the more efficient Turing architecture, and it can handle ray tracing as well, so the numbers don't tell the full picture. 

This is one beefy card though, and it features 3,072 CUDA cores and 48 RT cores, 384 Tensor cores, and 16GB of GDDR6 memory

The real-time ray-tracing and AI capabilities inherent in Quadro RTX GPUs have transformed the way we as architects visualize and process the data for our designs. The ability to interact with physically accurate models in real time means we’re making smarter design decisions faster, further freeing us to focus on creating our best work while saving clients time and money. - Cobus Bothma, director of applied research at KPF.

Furthermore, it's not just the Quadro RTX 5000 that you'll see in laptops. The RTX 3000 and 4000 will be making their way to notebooks as well, so there'll be something for different budgets.
 

Notebooks designed explicitly for creative professionals - Enter the RTX Studio badge of certification

NVIDIA is branding the entire initiative as part of something called RTX Studio, which will see 17 laptops from seven different brands at launch. Many familiar names are onboard with RTX Studio, with Acer, ASUS, Dell Gigabyte, HP, MSI, and Razer all having announced laptops that are part of the new initiative. That said, RTX Studio will encompass both hardware and software, and will also include APIs, SDKs, and drivers designed to improve performance and efficiency in creative software. 

A laptop also doesn't have to use a Quadro GPU to be part of RTX Studio, and they can offer options for the GeForce RTX 2060, 2070, and 2080 as well. Here's a list of partners and their notebook models that are RTX Studio certified:-

  • Acer’s ConceptD 7 and ConceptD 9 (up to a Quadro RTX 5000 GPU, GeForce RTX also available)
  • ASUS StudioBook 700G3T and W500 (up to Quadro RTX graphics)
  • ASUS ZenBook Pro Duo (GeForce RTX)
  • Dell’s Alienware m15 Creators Edition (GeForce RTX)
  • Gigabyte’s AERO 17 and AERO 15 (GeForce RTX)
  • HP’s OMEN X 2S (GeForce RTX)
  • MSI WS65 (up to Quadro RTX 5000 GPU)
  • MSI WS75, WE75, P75 and P65 (up to Quadro RTX graphics)
  • Razer Blade Studio Edition (up to Quadro RTX 5000 GPU)

The Studio Drivers, which are being renamed from the current Creator-Ready Drivers, are tested with software from names like Adobe, Avid, Autodesk, Unity, Blackmagic Design, and Maxon. To make things easier for developers, NVIDIA will let them use CUDA-X AI software to automate certain tasks like image upscaling and video color matching.

According to NVIDIA, an RTX Studio laptop with a Core i7 chip and GeForce RTX 2080 Max-Q GPU ended up being seven times faster than a MacBook Pro with a Core i9 processor and AMD Radeon Pro Vega 20 graphics in programs like Maya and RedCine-X Pro. 

Separately, NVIDIA is looking to upgrade its older Quadro chips. For example, the P520 and P620 both feature more CUDA cores and higher memory bandwidth. The same goes for the new Quadro T1000 and T2000 cards, which will replace the existing P1000 and P2000.

The new RTX Studio laptops are expected to be available starting in June.

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