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Apple creates 'Everyone Can Create' curriculum to encourage creativity and iPad use in schools

By Kenny Yeo - on 28 Mar 2018, 6:00am

Apple creates 'Everyone Can Create' curriculum to encourage creativity and iPad use in schools

Everyone Can Create aims to make learning enjoyable and fun on the iPad. (Image source: Apple)

Alongside the new iPad, Apple also announced a bunch of other stuff designed to encourage and increase iPad usage in schools.

The first is the ‘Everyone Can Create’ curriculum. Developed in collaboration with educators and creative professionals, the curriculum includes teacher guides, lessons, ideas, and examples to help teachers incorporate the iPad in meaningful ways to teach subjects like English, Mathematics, and Science.

The idea is to integrate creative activities like drawing, music, and filmmaking into lessons so that they become more fun, interactive, and therefore, memorable.

Schoolwork makes it easy for teacher to assign homework. (Image source: Apple)

In addition to Everyone Can Create, Apple also announced the Schoolwork. Schoolwork is an app that lets teachers create assignments and view their students progress.

Classroom enables easy administration of students' iPads. (Image source: Apple)

Then there’s the Classroom app, which is coming to Macs. Classroom is an app that makes it easy for teachers to manage their students’ iPads during lessons. Using Classroom, teachers can launch apps, websites, and more, on their students iPads. They can also use Classroom to check on their students progress and view their screens.

Finally, Apple announced that all teachers and students will get 200GB of free iCloud storage.

All in all, these initiatives were introduced to promote the iPad and make it more attractive as an educational tool. They do sound interesting and encouraging, but only time will tell if it's enough to entice schools, teachers, and students.