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Product Listing

Acer Predator Triton 500 review: A solid and sleek 15-inch gaming machine

By Koh Wanzi - 1 Jul 2019
Launch SRP: S$3198

Performance benchmarks

Test setup and performance

Here's a full list of the notebooks we're looking at:

  • Acer Predator Triton 500
  • Aftershock Forge 15 Pro
  • ASUS ROG Zephyrus S GX531GW
  • Razer Blade 15 (2019)

I've included the Aftershock Forge 15 Pro to show how the Triton 500 stacks up against a laptop with the same 9th-generation Intel processor and a GeForce RTX 2060. Separately, the ASUS ROG Zephyrus S and Razer Blade will provide comparison figures to illustrate how much of an improvement, if any, the new Core i7-9750H chip provides over similarly configured notebooks with previous generation chips.

Test notebooks compared
  Acer Predator Triton 500 Aftershock Forge 15 Pro ASUS ROG Zephyrus S GX531GW Razer Blade 15 (2019)
  Acer Predator Triton 500 Aftershock Forge 15 Pro ASUS ROG Zephyrus S GX531GW Razer Blade 15 (2019)
Launch SRP
  • From S$3198
  • From S$2080
  • From S$3698
  • From S$4679
Processor and Chipset
  • Intel Core i7-9750H (2.6GHz, 12MB L3 cache)
  • Intel Core i7-9750H (2.6GHz, 12MB L3 cache)
  • Intel Core i7-8750H (2.2GHz, 9MB L3 cache)
  • Intel Core i7-8750H (2.2GHz, 9MB L3 cache)
Operating System
  • Windows 10
  • Windows 10
  • Windows 10
  • Windows 10
System Memory
  • 16GB DDR4-2666 dual-channel RAM
  • 16GB DDR4-2666 dual-channel RAM
  • 16GB DDR4-2666 dual-channel RAM
  • 16GB DDR4-2667 dual-channel RAM
Video & Display
  • NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2070 Max-Q
  • 15.6-inch 1,920 x 1,080-pixel 144Hz IPS display
  • NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2060
  • 15.6-inch 1,920 x 1,080-pixel 144Hz AHVA display
  • NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2070 Max-Q
  • 15.6-inch 1,920 x 1,080-pixel 144Hz IPS-type display
  • NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 Max-Q
  • 15.6-inch 1,920 x 1,080-pixel 144Hz IPS display
Storage
  • 512GB PCIe NVMe M.2 SSD
  • 512GB PCIe NVMe M.2 SSD
  • 512GB PCIe NVMe M.2 SSD
  • Samsung PM981 512GB PCIe NVMe M.2 SSD
Optical Drive
  • None
  • None
  • None
  • None
Connectivity
  • Killer E3000 2.5 Gigabit Ethernet Controller
  • Killer Wireless-AC 1550i Wireless Network Adapter
  • Bluetooth 5.0
  • Intel Wireless-AC 9560
  • Bluetooth 5.0
  • Intel Wireless-AC 9560
  • Bluetooth 5.0
  • Intel Wireless-AC 9560
  • Bluetooth 5.0
Audio
  • Built-in stereo speakers
  • Built-in stereo speakers
  • Built-in stereo speakers
  • Built-in stereo speakers
I/O Ports
  • 3x USB 3.1 (Gen 1) Type-A
  • 1x Thunderbolt 3
  • 1x HDMI 2.0
  • 1x Mini DisplayPort 1.4
  • 1x USB 2.0 port
  • 1x USB 3.0 (USB 3.1 Gen 1) port
  • 1x USB 3.1 Gen 2 port (Type A)
  • 1x DisplayPort 1.3 over USB 3.1 Gen 2 (Type-C)
  • 1x Mini Display 1.2 port
  • 1x HDMI 2.0 output port (with HDCP)
  • 1x 2-in-1 Audio Jack (Headphone / Microphone)
  • 1x Microphone jack
  • 1x RJ-45 LAN port
  • 1x USB 3.1 (Gen 2) Type-C
  • 1x USB 3.1 (Gen 1) Type-C
  • 1x USB 3.1 (Gen 2) Type-A
  • 2x USB 2.0
  • 1x HDMI 2.0
  • 1x 3.5mm headphone and microphone combo jack
  • 1x Kensington Lock
  • 1x microphone-in, headphone-out jack
  • 1x Thunderbolt 3
  • 3x USB 3.1 (Gen 1) Type-A
  • 1x HDMI 2.0b
  • 1x Mini DisplayPort 1.4
Battery Type
  • 84Wh
  • 47Wh
  • 60Wh
  • 80Wh Li-ion polymer
Dimensions
  • 358.5 x 255 x 17.9mm
  • 361 x 258 x 27.9mm
  • 360 x 268 x 15.35-16.15mm
  • 355 x 235 x 17.8mm
Weight
  • 2kg
  • 2.2 kg
  • 2.1 kg
  • 2.14 kg

I ran the notebooks through the following benchmarks:

  • PCMark 10
  • PCMark8
  • 3DMark
  • Deus Ex: Mankind Divided
  • Far Cry 5
  • Shadow of the Tomb Raider

 

How good is it for work?

It actually seems like the new Intel Core i7-9750H processor doesn't do much for productivity workloads, despite having a more aggressive 2.6GHz base clock and 4.5GHz boost clock. In PCMark 10 Extended, the Acer Predator Triton 500 still fell slightly behind the ASUS ROG Zephyrus S, even though it had the older Core i7-8750H chip. 

A look at the workload breakdown doesn't reveal any significant differences either, and the Predator Triton 500 didn't manage carve out any kind of lead for itself. That said, all the notebooks here are more than fast enough for work and productivity applications, and it's unlikely that you'll notice differences between them.  

For storage performance, the Western Digital PC SN720 NVMe SSD on the Acer laptop fell somewhere in the middle of the pack. It handily beat the QLC NAND drive on the ASUS ROG Zephyrus S, but it was still slower than the SSDs on the Aftershock and Razer laptops.

 

How fast is it in games?

The Predator Triton 500 comes with a built-in GPU overclocking feature, which means you'll be able to increase the base and boost clocks right from the PredatorSense software. There are three modes to pick from, including Normal, Fast, and Extreme. I've listed their respective clock speeds in the table below for easier reference:

  Base Boost Memory
Normal 885MHz 1,185MHz 1,500MHz
Fast 960MHz 1,260MHz 1,550MHz
Extreme 985MHz 1,285MHz 1,568MHz

The clock speeds at Normal mode are basically what everyone else is running, but Extreme mode takes you up an entire 100MHz on the base clock, with a memory overclock to boot. I ran our benchmarks in Normal mode to provide a fairer comparison with the other laptops, but boosting to Extreme mode does net you a small performance boost of roughly 3 to 4 per cent. For example, Shadow of the Tomb Raider saw a boost to 79FPS at High settings. The easy overclocking experience is pretty neat, especially with the one-click Turbo button, and I like that Acer has provided an easy way to squeeze out more frames from the GPU. 

However, the extra performance doesn't add up to much, and I don't think it amounts to a game-changer if you're deciding between the Acer notebook and something else.

That aside, the Predator Triton 500 held its own in the gaming benchmarks, even without overclocking the GPU. However, performance was really similar to what the ASUS ROG Zephyrus S was able to achieve with its Core i7-8750H and GeForce RTX 2070 Max-Q. In 3DMark Fire Strike, the Predator Triton 500 was 12 per cent faster than the Aftershock Forge 15 Pro, but only a mere 1.6 per cent ahead of the Zephyrus S. 

In fact, the Acer laptop was oddly slow in Deus Ex: Mankind Divided, lagging behind the ASUS notebook by 11 per cent. Fortunately, things picked up in the other games. It managed to edge out the Razer Blade 15 and its GeForce RTX 2080 Max-Q in Far Cry 5 (probably because that game seems to be limited by the CPU on laptops), and was behind only the Razer laptop in Shadow of the Tomb Raider

 

How good is the battery life?

Acer managed to cram a decent-sized 84Wh battery into the Predator Triton 500, so battery life is actually pretty competitive. It took the lead in our PCMark 8 Home battery life test, lasting for over four hours. Granted, that's not a super stellar result if you want to use the laptop for work, but it's pretty good as far as gaming laptops go. 

Its long battery life, slim dimensions, and relatively light weight also helped it in our portability index, which is intended as an objective measure of how portable a laptop is after taking into account factors like weight, battery life, and dimensions. 

 

Does it run hot?

Finally, I'm pretty pleased with the thermal performance as well. That said, we carry out all our temperature testing in an air-conditioned room, so the numbers will probably be higher if you're running the laptop without the AC turned on. Either way, after 40 loops of 3DMark Fire Strike Extreme's stress test, the Predator Triton 500 posted cooler peak CPU and GPU temperatures than both the ASUS ROG Zephyrus S and Razer Blade 15. Surface temperatures were pretty low too, and the palm rests almost never got uncomfortably warm. 

8.0
  • Design 8
  • Features 8.5
  • Performance 8.5
  • Value 8
  • Mobility 8.5
The Good
Tasteful design
Slim and light aluminum chassis
Decent battery life
Competitive price
The Bad
Noisy fans
No per-key RGB backlighting customizations
Not easy to upgrade
Jarring boot-up sound sequence