Obsessed with technology?
Subscribe to the latest tech news as well as exciting promotions from us and our partners!
By subscribing, you indicate that you have read & understood the SPH's Privacy Policy and PDPA Statement.
News
News Categories
Cado air purifiers from Japan launch in Singapore, with a focus on tech and design
By Alvin Soon - on 24 Jun 2016, 3:50pm

Cado air purifiers from Japan launch in Singapore, focus on tech and design

The Cado AP-C700S.

Cado, a Japanese company, has just launched their air purifiers in Singapore. Co-founded by a Sony veteran and a Toshiba alumni, Cado prides itself on technology and design, making air purifiers that perform well and look good in the home.

Cado, which its founder Noriyuki Koga says means both the “way of flower” (kado in Japanese, another name for ikebana, or “arranging flowers) and “gift” (cadeau in French), was founded in 2012. It makes a range of air purifiers, humidifiers and water servers, and is bringing three air purifiers for the room into Singapore: the AP-C700S, the AP-C300, and the AP-C100.

The Cado AP-C300.

Cado claims the AP-C700S is “the best performing air purifier in the world,” as it’s the first Japanese air purifier to achieve the highest CADR (Clean Air Delivery Rate) rating. CADR is an independent test result from the Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers, which measures how quickly an air purifier filters air per minute.

CADR isn’t the most important number for an air purifier however, that belongs to the size of the particle an air purifier can filter. There are two ways of measuring particle matter (PM): PM10 and PM2.5. PM10 measures particles from 2.5 to 10 microns in diameter, while PM2.5 measures particles 2.5 microns in diameter or less.

The Cado AP-C100.

PM10 particles can be trapped by your nose or throat, but PM2.5 particles are so small that they can slip through and lodge in your lungs, causing all sorts of health problems. Cado’s air purifiers block PM2.5 particles that have a diameter of less than 2.5 microns. However, they’re listed as HEPA-type filters, not true HEPA (High Efficiency Particulate Air) filters, and there’s some argument over whether HEPA-type filters are as effective.

One unique thing about the Cado air purifiers is their self-cleaning technology, Cado claims that it’s able to break down trapped particles inside the unit into carbon dioxide and water, so the filter doesn’t get clogged up as quickly.

As for its looks, we can’t say it looks unattractive, but neither do other air purifiers on the market today, like the Dyson Pure Cool Link and the Xiaomi air purifier. If you’re not sure what matters in an air purifier, here are the top 5 things you need to look for when buying one.


Obsessed with technology?
Subscribe to the latest tech news as well as exciting promotions from us and our partners!
By subscribing, you indicate that you have read & understood the SPH's Privacy Policy and PDPA Statement.