Casings Guide

NZXT Phantom 630 review

NZXT Phantom 630 Ultra Tower Chassis - Tall, Grey and Handsome

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Launch SRP S$288
Latest Price From S$249 (Check Latest Prices)

Overall rating 8.5/10
Aesthetics:
8.5
Functionality:
8.5
Usability:
8.5
Value:
8
THE GOOD
Flexible cooling and installation options
Generous bundle of cooling fans
Central control for fan speeds
THE BAD
Side metal panels attracted fingerprints
Heavy and difficult to move


Conclusion

Conclusion

The Phantom 630 ultra tower casing left quite an impression on us. From its modular 3.5-inch drive enclosure system to its configurable cooling options, the designers of the chassis clearly had a vision to come out with a chassis that is able to meet the cooling requirements of serious system builders. Besides the cooling fans, the chassis has many vents to allow for good air flow, with a total of five easily serviceable filters to prevent excessive dust accumulation inside. It is evident that the case designers have paid attention to the miniscule details. For example, even their mounting screws came in resealable plastic bags that are clearly labeled.

If there are any grouses, they are minor ones, especially if we are to complain about the location of the control panel as well as the I/O ports. If a proud enthusiast wants to place the imposing Phantom 630 on his/her desk, it would be difficult to reach the top of the chassis for the relevant controls. This isn't an issue if the casing is placed on the floor. Another nitpick is the placement and definition of the control buttons as it can be difficult to just feel your way to activating the required control. Elsewhere, because of the casing's electrostatic coating finish on its exterior metal panels, the side panels picked up a lot of our fingerprints. Yet another nitpick is the weight of the casing as it tips the scales with an empty weight of 12.3kg, and with our installed components, we estimated its weight to be almost 16kg. It is quite a task to move the system, and coupled with the precarious position of the bottom front filter; there is a possibility of dropping the casing when moving it to another location. Perhaps the inclusion of bottom-mounted wheels with locks would make such a task less back breaking, should be in order?

In conclusion, the Phantom 630 marks an improvement from the original Phantom, with its redesigned interior and a slightly updated exterior. Fortunately, all of this is achieved without losing track of its main emphasis of providing excellent cooling capabilities to the system. The chassis is available locally for S$288, and at this price tag, it is about S$80 more expensive than your high-end full tower casings like the Corsair Obsidian Series 550D that retails at S$209. Compared to a similar "ultra tower casing" like the Cooler Master HAF X, which is available for S$259, paying an additional S$29 for the newer Phantom 630, doesn't seem too extravagant after all. Hence, if you are on the lookout for a casing that is larger than a standard full tower one, and want to have the option of upgrading to liquid cooling systems in the future with plenty of expansion options and space to expand without any sacrifice, we would definitely recommend the NZXT Phantom 630.