NVIDIA GeForce GTX 650 Ti Boost - The New & Improved Mid-Range Kepler


Test Setup

Test Setup

For those who've been following our reviews, take note that we've replaced our old test rig with a brand new one for 2013. Here are the new specs we'll be running with:

  • Intel Core i7-3960X (3.3GHz)
  • ASUS P9X79 Pro (Intel X79 chipset) Motherboard
  • 4 x 2GB DDR3-1600 G.Skill Ripjaws Memory
  • Seagate 7200.10 200GB SATA hard drive (OS)
  • Western Digital Caviar Black 7200 RPM 1TB SATA hard drive (Benchmarks + Games)
  • Windows 7 Ultimate 64-bit

Here's the list of cards we'll be testing and the drivers used.

  • NVIDIA GeForce GTX 650 Ti Boost 2GB GDDR5 (NVIDIA ForceWare 314.21 Beta)
  • NVIDIA GeForce GTX 650 Ti 1GB GDDR5 (NVIDIA ForceWare 310.90)
  • NVIDIA GeForce GTX 660 2GB GDDR5 (NVIDIA ForceWare 314.14)
  • ASUS Radeon HD 7790 DirectCU2 1GB GDDR5 (AMD Catalyst 13.3 Beta)
  • AMD Radeon HD 7770 1GB GDDR5 (AMD Catalyst 13.2 Beta)
  • AMD Radeon HD 7850 2GB GDDR5 (AMD Catalyst 13.2 Beta) 

N.B.: The ForceWare 314.21 Beta drivers we were supplied with only worked with the GTX 650 Ti Boost, and as such, it may hold a slight advantage over the other NVIDIA cards using marginally older drivers. 

Benchmarks

We've also updated our benchmark list, adding Unigine's new Valley benchmark, as well as 3DMark 2013 and the big one, Crysis 3! We've also updated Unigine from version 3.0 to 4.0.

  • Futuremark 3DMark 11
  • Futuremark 3DMark (2013)
  • Unigine 4.0 "Heaven"
  • Unigine "Valley" 1.0
  • Battlefield: Bad Company 2
  • Crysis Warhead
  • Crysis 2
  • Dirt 3
  • Assassin's Creed 3
  • Call of Duty: Black Ops 2
  • Hitman: Absolution
  • Far Cry 3
  • Crysis 3
8.5
Performance
8.5
Features
7.5
Value
8.5
The Good
Close to GTX 660 performance
Great value
The Bad
Average overclocking potential
Reference design is bigger than the original GTX 650 Ti