Digital Cameras Guide

Nikon Df review

Nikon Df Review - Df for Digital conFusion

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Launch SRP
S$3,699 (body alone)
S$3,999 (with AF-S Nikkor 50mm f/1.8G kit lens)

Overall rating 7/10
Performance:
9
Design:
6
Features:
6
User-Friendliness:
6
Value:
7
THE GOOD
Lightest FX body in Nikon's stable
High battery life
Stellar image quality
High ISO low noise images
THE BAD
Retro controls are clunky
Digital 'fusion' is inconsistent
Front dial is stiff and hard to use
AF points are bunched in the center


Image Performance

Image Performance

The Df comes with the same sensor found in the flagship D4, so image quality is as expected: Very, very good. In fact, we don't have a D4 to test it against, but Thom Hogan has said that from base ISO to ISO 1600, images are actually cleaner from the Df than the D4. From ISO 1600 and above, it looks to be the same. Like the D4, the Df can 'see into the dark', with high ISO and low image noise performance. This is a camera we'd comfortably shoot up to ISO 3200 with, and ISO 6400 with some noise reduction applied. The Df is easily among the best high ISO full-frame cameras in the market today.

If we look at the economics of it, the sensor is the best and only reason I can find to recommend this camera. Nikon's flagship D4 retailed at S$9,799 at launch, and you're getting the same image performance for less than half price at S$3,699 for the Df body alone. However, you're only getting the Multi-CAM 4800 AF system and coverage from the entry-level D610, and not the Advanced Multi-CAM 3500FX AF system from the D800 and D4.

These sample photographs were shot with the Nikon Df. The originals were shot in raw and processed to taste with no noise reduction applied. They were exported to JPEG in AdobeRGB, and are copyright to SPH Magazines. These photographs are provided for your reference only and we ask that you do not reproduce them elsewhere. Click for the full-resolution JPEG exports.