First Looks: Logitech G3 Gaming Mouse

Logitech's Left Wing Mouse

Logitech's Left Wing Mouse

The aged Logitech G1, designed and built with an 800 DPI tracking technology has since been outclassed by almost every gaming rodent on this planet. There is the hefty G5 of course, but we all know that the G5 isn't everyone's cup of tea. In the midst of dwindling hopes, Logitech finally decided to revise its product lineup and replace the long overdue G1 with the new G3 laser gaming mouse.

Real Old-School Rodent

G1 fans will be delighted that its successor has stuck to its winning formula of being a simple yet formidable peripheral, and will immediately feel accustomed to the familiar look and feel of the mouse. Dressed mostly in black, this gaming mouse also sports a dash of Logitech’s trademark ‘contoured metal’ surface to spruce up its bling factor. Aside from the cosmetics, the G3 offers non-slip surfaces along the sides for better grip, excellent Teflon feet (rated to last 250km), as well as responsive, albeit slightly stiff buttons (though some like it this way).

One of the main features that the G3 strongly addresses is DPI tracking. With a cutting-edge 2000 DPI laser tracker paired with a 6.4 megapixel-a-second image processing engine within, the G3 will surely keep up with the strenuous finger acrobatics aligned with gaming. To harness all these new found powers, Logitech also included a shortcut button smack right bellow the scroll wheel to lower or increase sensitivity in a split second for those tricky sniper scope shots and giving you the extra edge in those crucial moments. However, we must point out a foreseeable limitation to this function – as the button rotates between programed sensitivity modes (800dpi, 1600dpi, 2000dpi), it would take a few clicks to get to your preferred one and costing you precious split-seconds. There is a workaround to this problem, which involves not installing Logitech Setpoint Drivers, sacrificing 400 dpi (the G3 only detects 800dpi and 1600dpi mode without drivers). However, we're sure no one would deliberately gimp their G3 this way.

Bumbling Buttons

Casual users who prefer to rest their entire palm and full length of fingers on the mouse in a slothful manner should expect interference with the side buttons on the G3. The two buttons are exactly in the position where the thumb and ring finger would usually grip, leading to many an accidental click – a learning curve that G3 users will have to overcome.

Being programmable, the side buttons are quite useful in day-to-day desktop tasks, but may prove to be a challenge for gamers. With the increased sensitivity of the G3 and its light weight, applying pressure on the either side buttons can easily cause the mouse to strafe to a side, making it difficult to use them for any function that involves precision, which is almost everything when you're referring to fast paced first person shooters.

Of Lefties and the 1337

The G3 would mostly appeal to two groups of people: the ‘mice nazis’ that are very particular with mouse control, and left-handers. For the elitists who prefer to hold their mice ‘old-school style’ using only their fingertips for maximum reflexes, the G3 is quintessentially the mouse for them with its small dimensions and light weight. In fact, our issues with the side buttons are relieved this way due to minimal contact deriving from the fingertips. Meanwhile, the G3 will be a boon for left-handed Logitech fans, as the G3 will be the only gaming mouse from Logitech to offer ambidextrous support with the G1 phased out.

Final Thoughts

Skirting fancy lights and other non-essential features, the G3 works the floor by improving what matters most and delivering it in reliable Logitech fashion. Offering a large leap in DPI count and remaining deadly accurate is the G3’s strongest point and quite possibly the deliverance G1 fans have been clamoring for. In a nutshell, the G3 mouse is an excellent upgrade for the left-handed gamers or those who prefer a smaller, more responsive mouse.