Custom Cooler at Last - Palit GeForce GTX 260 Sonic 216 SP


The Palit GeForce GTX 260 Sonic 216 SP

The Palit GeForce GTX 260 Sonic 216 SP

First of all, the card's name should give you a clue of what to expect. The Sonic badge, much like Type-R badges on souped-up Hondas, indicates that it is from Palit's line of factory-overclocked cards. If you are wondering, and you must be, the Palit GTX 260+ Sonic comes with its core clocked at 625MHz, memory at 2200MHz DDR and shaders at 1348MHz, substantially more than the reference's clock speeds of 576MHz at the core, 1998MHz DDR at the memory, and finally, 1242MHz at the shaders. What these figures all mean is that it should perform significantly better than a reference GTX 260+.

However, sheer outright clock speeds are not the core focus in this segement. The highlight of this card has got to be its customized cooler. The cooler, at first glance, is remarkably similar to the one found the Revolution 700, except that it is slimmer and the whole card only occupies two slots in total. It features massive twin 75mm fans, which blow cool air over an elaborate heatsink with triple heat pipes and multiple fins. It looks really aggressive and we are hoping for some good temperature readings in our tests.

The Palit GTX 260+ employs what seems to be a twin-slot version of the very same cooler than was used in the triple-slot Revolution 700.

Palit's custom cooler on top, NVIDIA's boring reference cooler at the bottom; look at the world of difference!

A closeup of the rather large 75mm fans, which blows cool air onto the large elaborate heatsink just underneath.

Sadly, the Palit GTX 260+ Sonic comes only with the standard two Dual-Link DVI outputs and 7-pin mini-DIN. An additional HDMI or DisplayPort would have been ideal.

Two SLI connectors mean 3-way SLI is a possibility, and with NVIDIA's flexible configurations, you can hook up an older card to offload PhysX processing if it pleases you.