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Palit GeForce GTX 260 Sonic 216 SP (896MB) review

Custom Cooler at Last - Palit GeForce GTX 260 Sonic 216 SP

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Prayers Answered... At Last!

Our Prayers Answered... At Last!

Thanks to driver upgrades, NVIDIA's GTX 200 series of cards are looking competitive again and none more so than their GeForce GTX 260 Core 216 (hence forth known as GTX 260+). Armed with more stream processors, a reference GeForce GTX 260+ was more than a match of its rival, the Radeon HD 4870 from ATI. However, if there was anything the NVIDIA cards were lacking, it was custom cooling solutions.

ATI's Radeon HD 4870 cards had long had custom coolers. PowerColor's PCS+ HD 4870 was one of the earliest Radeon HD 4870 cards we tested, and even then it was already utilizing a PCS+ cooling solution customized by ZEROtherm. Sometime later, we tested Palit's HD 4870 Sonic, which had a dual-fan cooling solution that would later form the basis of the cooler found on the Revolution 700. While all this was happening, NVIDIA was completely out of action as far as customized coolers were concerned, much like a child who had brought nothing for show-and-tell in class. Until now, that is.

The new Palit GeForce GTX 260 Sonic 216 SP (hence forth known as Palit GTX 260+ Sonic) is like a breath of fresh air in a stale warehouse or like an attractive lady in an army barrack full of men. Featuring a dual-fan cooling solution that closely resembles that of the one found on the triple-slot Revolution 700, the Palit GTX 260+ Sonic, is to our knowledge the first GTX 260+ card, or any GTX 200 series card for that matter, to employ the use of a customized cooler. At long last, we can finally say goodbye to boring and frankly quite ineffective NVIDIA reference coolers.

Before we reveal more about this exciting-looking card, here's a look at the card itself.