Feature Articles

NVIDIA GTC 2013 Roundup - Lighting Every Pixel in the World

NVIDIA GTC 2013 Roundup: Lighting Every Pixel in the World

NVIDIA GTC 2013 Roundup: Lighting Every Pixel in the World

At this year's GPU Technology Conference (GTC), NVIDIA CEO Jen-Hsun Huang reiterated a powerful statement that was uttered three years ago at CES 2010, that he wanted NVIDIA to light every pixel in the world, regardless of its usage and size. In his keynote address, he highlighted products and their achievements that added conviction to his uttered statement.

He was quick to expound the graphical prowess of the Kepler GPU; from its implementation in the latest GeForce GTX Titan graphics card to the enterprise-based Tesla K20 card. The latter also powered the company's latest hardware offering in the form of the NVIDIA Visual Computing Appliance (VCA). This GRID-based server that is geared towards small and medium businesses, aims to centralize the graphical processing requirements and deliver the output to clients' devices via NVIDIA Workspaces. These devices are merely display and I/O devices in the hands of the users, and the magic of VCA is its ease of configuration according to the disparate computing requirements across a board spectrum of users.

On the mobile front, NVIDIA has doubled down on the future of Tegra with the announcement of Logan and Parker respectively. The former is the immediate successor to Tegra 4 that will be released in late 2013; while its successor, the Parker system on chip (SoC) will feature a 64-bit Denver CPU, coupled with a Maxwell GPU. The Maxwell GPU is the successor to the incumbent Kepler, and the next-generation GPU's marque feature is its "unified virtual memory", which builds on CUDA 5.0's unified virtual address space. Maxwell's successor, Volta, promises to be more exciting with its stacked DRAM that will increase its video memory bandwidth to a whopping 1TB/s!

By offering GPU hardware upgrades from desktops to mobile computing devices and its foray into the server-business with its VCA, NVIDIA appears set to grow its foothold in the GP-GPU computing sector in a manner that is true to its mantra of wanting to power every pixel in the world. On the gaming front, NVIDIA was showing off even more demos of its Project Shield in action:-

Highlights from GTC 2013
Viewing Computer Graphics from Two Different Perspectives

Viewing Computer Graphics from Two Different Perspectives

FEATURE / 24 Mar 2013

From NVIDIA CEO's keynote address at GTC 2013, the notion of computer graphics is that it has to be realistic, a true-to-life representation of our surroundings comprising both living and non-living things. However, not all industries require this and computer graphics can be applied to information and non-geometric analysis. We share views from NVIDIA and Boeing.

NVIDIA Tegra Updates from GTC 2013

NVIDIA Tegra Updates from GTC 2013

FEATURE / 21 Mar 2013

With information gleaned from different session at GPU Technology Conference (GTC) 2013, we pieced together a short update on Tegra's developments so far from the unveiling of the Tegra 4 at CES 2013 to its successors in the form of Logan and Parker respectively. There was also a Kayla sideshow too!

NVIDIA Unveils Own GRID-Based Server, the Visual Computing Appliance (VCA)

NVIDIA Unveils Own GRID-Based Server, the Visual Computing Appliance (VCA)

NEWS / 20 Mar 2013

At the first keynote address at GTC 2013, NVIDIA CEO unveiled the company's very own GRID-based server named Visual Computing Appliance (VCA). This server features a pair of Intel Xeon CPUs with eight Kepler-based graphics cards. It marks the upscaling of GRID technology to meet enterprise needs.

NVIDIA Reveals Product Roadmaps for GPUs and Tegra SoCs

NVIDIA Reveals Product Roadmaps for GPUs and Tegra SoCs

NEWS / 20 Mar 2013

During his keynote address at GTC 2013, NVIDIA CEO Jen-Hsun Huang revealed the roadmaps for its graphics processors and Tegra chips. Both roadmaps introduced the successors that will replace the incumbents Kepler and Tegra 4 respectively. Read on to uncover more exciting details.