CES 2010: Show Floor Coverage (Part 2)


3D Tech Zone Highlights

3D Tech Zone Highlights

The organizers for CES 2010 allocated a section of the show floor for 3D technology and while the important TV brands had their own dedicated booths, there were some takers. Here were some of what we saw:

A big fish in a small pond, Mitsubishi was the clear brand name among the other vendors at CES 2010's designated 3D Tech Zone.

A trailer setup with almost complete darkness was where Mitsubishi showed off all its TVs, mostly 3D models along with a huge LaserVue, if you would know, is limited in retail and priced substantially.

Even with so many TV brands showing off 3D displays, there was still quite a queue at Mitsubishi's demo. Is there really such a demand for 3D in TV and movies? We even overheard two employees in the Mitsubishi trailer remarking that some attendees appeared to be repeat visitors.

The one and only company with a 3D digital compact camera, the Finepix Real 3D W1, Fujifilm had a smallish booth showing off this camera.

Even though the Fujifilm camera can take pictures in 3D, you can't display them easily on your typical PC monitor. Instead, special equipment like this 3D capable photo frame is required, limiting the adoption of such cameras.

Here is the 3D camera, the W1. While you can view the captured image in 3D on this camera, if you want the 3D image in print, you'll need to send it to a lab in Tokyo to get it printed. Estimated turnaround time is 10 days with a US$5 fee.

Hyundai may not have a presence in terms of televisions but it does displays too like this 24-inch full HD 3D LCD monitor (W240S) that has all the usual specs you expect from such a monitor.

A much larger 46-inch full HD 3D LCD monitor, the S465D has a 6ms response time, contrast ratio of 3000:1 and three HDMI inputs.

Along with the bigger companies doing the 3D TVs and cameras, there are the smaller ones like MicroVision here which does custom passive 3D glasses for other companies e.g. for marketing purposes.